Struts & Faucet hosts a series of five-week artist residencies in the gallery each year. Artists in residence can continue their practice or develop a project or site-specific work and are encouraged to creatively engage with the community through screenings, talks, workshops, projects, or events.

Struts & Faucet offers an artist fee and per diem, covers the cost of travel and any materials associated with workshops or other public events, and provides accommodation for the artist in the Struts & Faucet apartment.

Residencies are selected by a committee of Struts & Faucet members after an open call for proposals.

Studio + Facilities:

Artists in residence are offered the Struts & Faucet’s main gallery space to use as a studio space. Artists have access to digital media suites and equipment, Super 8 and 16mm film facilities, and other flexible studio areas within the building. Offsite locations can be considered on a project-by-project basis.

Apartment:

Artists in residence stay in the Struts & Faucet apartment, located above the gallery. This private apartment is fully furnished and includes linens and towels.

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Artist in Residence

Madeleine Mayo
April 1, 2019 – May 3, 2019

Madeleine Mayo is an artist based in Montreal, Canada. Her work spans painting, sculpture and installation to explore sensuality as a means to connect embodied experience with mythical imagination. To her, objects and paintings are not lifeless things and possess all the potential to behave or misbehave that implies. Mayo’s work asserts the validity of pleasure as a means to better understand unseen forces in her own reality while affirming the body and the physical world. She is interested in the blurred edge between figuration and abstraction as a way to respond to the blurred edge between fantasy and reality.

Upcoming Residencies

Jon Sasaki
September 22, 2019 - October 26, 2019

Jon Sasaki is a Toronto-based multidisciplinary artist whose practice brings performance, video, object and installation into a framework where expectation and outcome never align, generating a simultaneous sense of pathos and levity. His work employs reason-based approaches reminiscent of conceptual art while investigating romantic subjects; in this juxtaposition, Sasaki creates humorous, self-exhaustive systems caught in cycles of trial and error.

His work has been exhibited in solo exhibitions at the Ottawa Art Gallery, (Ottawa, ON); the Southern Alberta Art Gallery, (Lethbridge, AB); the Art Gallery of Ontario, as well as a 2015 performance project at the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit. Sasaki has participated in recent group exhibitions at the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, (Seoul, South Korea,) Prince Takamado Gallery, Canadian Embassy in Japan, (Tokyo); Nihonbashi Institute of Contemporary Art, (Tokyo, Japan); and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (Toronto, ON). He has completed recent public art commissions for Sheridan College, (Oakville, ON) and the City of Barrie Ontario, and along with collaborator Jennifer Davis was the recipient of a 2017 Concepts award from the Ontario Association of Architects. His video work has screened at the MCA (Sydney, Australia); Brick + Mortar Film Festival, (Greenfield, MA) and the Images Festival (Toronto, ON). He was the recipient of the 2015 Canadian Glenfiddich Artists in Residence Prize (Dufftown, Scotland.) Sasaki holds a BFA from Mount Allison University (Sackville, NB) and is represented by Clint Roenisch Gallery in Toronto.

Lou Sheppard
May 12, 2019 - June 15, 2019

Lou Sheppard is a Canadian artist working in performance and installation practices. Of settler ancestry, Sheppard was raised on unceded Mi’Kmaq territory, and currently lives in K’jiputuk/Halifax. A graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, their work has been exhibited both in Canada and internationally, and was included in the Antarctic Biennale and the Antarctic Pavilion at the 57th Venice Biennial. In 2017 Sheppard was selected for the Emerging Atlantic Artist Award by the Hnatyshyn Foundation to complete a program that composes music based on concentrations of sea ice. In 2018 Sheppard will be a guest artist at the University of Huston, a speaker at the The Antarctic Vision Club at the Pushkin Museum in Moscow, and will complete a cross Canada speaking tour as part of the Emerging Atlantic Artist Award. They were recently artist-in-residence at the Cité des Arts in Paris with the support of the Canada Council for the Arts, and will complete a residency and exhibition with the khyber, and at the Doris McCarthy AIR in Toronto in Spring/Summer 2018.

Sheppard’s recent work has been focused on processes of translation, particularly translations between meaning systems that do not align in conventional ways. Working with a range of source materials (diagnostic criteria, environmental data, field recordings and field samples) they work in a variety of media and disciplines, producing musical compositions, choreographies, drawings and other poetic gestures. These interpretations interrogate the meaning of the source material and point to alternative epistemologies—disrupting empirical modes of assessment. Sheppard’s work is characterized by archival and museological models of exhibition, which allow for the centring of process, often returning to scientific language in the title and descriptions of the work. In its exhibition the work often appears as evidence of process, including schematics, research, and records of performance, inviting engagement with the process itself, as well as the result.

lousheppard.com

Image credit: Léa Giardin

Amy Siegel
May 4, 2020 - June 5, 2020

As an artist, educator, and documentarian, I am driven to foster work that combines and confounds notions of activism, art production and audience experience. My interdisciplinary practice spans video, installation, socially-engaged art and performance. I hold an MFA in Documentary Media and an MA in Adult Education and Community Development. I live, play, dream and work in Toronto on the traditional territory of the Wendat, Haudenosaunee, Anishinabek, and the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation.

Anna Hawkins
June 23, 2019 - July 27, 2019

Anna Hawkins is an artist based in Montreal, Canada. She works primarily with video and is concerned with the ways that images, gestures and information are transmitted, transformed and experienced online. Group exhibitions and screenings include the UCLA New Wight Biennial (Los Angeles, USA), the WRO Media Art Biennale (​Wrocław​, PL), and ​The ​Laocoön​ Dilemma​ at Galerie Sturm (Nürnberg, DE). She has exhibited a solo projects at Artspace (Peterborough, CA, 2015), Centre Clark (Montreal, CA, 2016) Eastern Edge Gallery (St. John’s, NL, 2016), and Untitled Art Society (Calgary, CA, 2018).

Benjamin Evans
June 8, 2020 - July 10, 2020

Benjamin Evans is an artist and writer currently based in the French Alps. He has zero formal training in data visualization, computer programming, MATLab, signal processing or sleep science in general. Originally from the Canadian province of Newfoundland, he has also spent seven years living in New York City where he directed the non-profit gallery NURTUREart and was active in the Brooklyn arts scene. He has exhibited previous bodies of work professionally in both Canadian and New York venues. While living in Paris, Evans opened the itinerant gallery project Projective City, which exhibited the work of emerging artists in Paris, New York and virtual spaces in between. He holds five degrees, including a PhD in philosophy and an MFA in mixed media, and has taught at several institutions, including the Alberta College of the Arts, The Parsons School of Design in New York and Parsons Paris. Having completed his PhD, he has recently returned to making art full time.

www.dreamrealizationlab.com

Cynthia Naggar
March 30, 2020 – May 1, 2020

Cynthia Naggar refines herself in digital art. Always pushing boundaries of her art, she innovates into public interactivity using video, sound and biofeedback. She has this desire to make visible the invisible in us. A minimalist work that illustrates a very primitive relationship between man and machine, but that somewhat questions the public about their presence in space and in the time that they occupy.

Video has always been at the heart of her work; a deconstructed and uncertain representation of memories. An influence of popular culture tinged with a poetic beauty that is at once absurd, funny and tragic.

Newly, she is exploring performance and new technologies.

Gesig Isaac & Jamie Ross
August 11, 2019 - September 14, 2019

Gesig Isaac and Jamie Ross propose an interdisciplinary social practice and time-based project grounded in the art of healing. Reacting to a political climate in which our survival as queer people, witches and contemporary artists is consistently rendered precarious, the concept of magical self-defence drives this work.

The discourse around a diversity of tactics to affect political change is one of the primordial and best elaborated debates of past hundred years within progressive politics. To fight pipelines, it’s widely agreed upon that signatures on petitions and direct action to physically halting pipeline production are both valid responses to ecocide. Beyond simply cataloguing queer and indigenous responses to state, vigilante and corporate violence in this way, Isaac and Ross pose a provocative question to those in the our communities of magical practitioners: what are the spiritual ethics of stopping violence? – to say nothing of responsibility to speak truth to power. What tools and traditions have we inherited in our respective traditions related to ending violence – when can poisonous plant medicines create peace?

Bios

Gesig Isaac is a 28 year old Queer, Mi’gmaq multidisciplinary artist. Gesig’s art practice explores themes of Indigenous language retention, ecology, and land-based
knowledge. These themes take form within a material based artistic practice centred
around basket weaving, hide tanning, textiles, and ceramics. She hopes to investigate further the narrative potential between her knowledge of plants and the natural world, and her artistic practice. Gesig lives in Kjipuktuk aka Halifax.

Jamie Ross is a contemporary artist, diviner and witch. His award-winning video works have screened on four continents. He works as a professional card diviner, a consulting spellworker and as the chaplain for men incarcerated in federal prisons in Quebec. Creating and documenting queer community based on a sincere engagement with magic, grafting himself onto the rich artistic traditions of his cultural and biological ancestors is fundamental. He lives in Tiohtià:ke / Mooniyang (Montreal). Jamieross.org

The Artists

For years, Ross aimed to keep his work as a preschool teacher and pagan prison chaplain distinct from his more conventional visual arts practice of film and installation video-making. In 2016, he formally bridged the two domains, participating in a group exhibition curated by Amish Morell at the Doris McCarthy Gallery (University of Toronto) Outdoor School and was invited to exhibit in his capacity as a professional witch and a contemporary artist at Verticale and Eastern Bloc in Montreal to mount a solo exhibition featuring his social practice chaplaincy work in greater Montreal (April-May 2017).

In a similar vein, Gesig’s years of deep expertise in Mi’gmaq traditional art forms of black ash basketry and professional herbalism have rarely been consciously presented in a contemporary art framework, let alone in her nation’s territory in the Maritimes, where she has returned to live. The ability to execute this project on her traditional territory is crucial to grounding it in decolonial practice.

Ray Fenwick
July 13, 2020 - August 14, 2020

I’m an interdisciplinary artist whose work seems to keep coming back to complicated relationships with communication, often exploring the absurdities and anxieties that surround our attempts to connect. The way language interferes with and frames our ability to know ourselves and one another is endlessly strange to me. And heartbreaking. And funny.


Ray Fenwick is an interdisciplinary artist working with performance, video, sound and typography.He has an undergraduate degree from NSCAD and an MFA Degree from the University of Manitoba. He has participated in residencies at Struts Gallery (NB), Plug-In ICA (MB), and Owens Art Gallery (NB). He has exhibited, performed, and screened work in both Canada and the U.S., and has spoken about his work at galleries, conferences and universities in both countries. He has run workshops exploring performance and sound for both youth and adults. He has received grants from the Canada Council, Manitoba Arts Council, Winnipeg Arts Council and Nova Scotia Culture and Heritage.

His performance work lies somewhere between experimental comedy and sound art, and has been performed at many venues including Galerie Sans Nom (NB), Grenfell Art Gallery (NFLD), Southern Alberta Art Gallery (AB), Truck Gallery (AB), Plug-In ICA (MB), WNDX Festival (MB) and more. He has also performed this work in bars and at music festivals.

His band Pastoralia is an art, performance and music hybrid that acts as a meeting point between the practices of Fenwick and Halifax artist Mitchell Wiebe. Pastoralia has performed at various venues, including the opening of Mass MoCA’s Oh Canada exhibition (MA, USA), Nocturne festival (NS), Saltbox Performance Festival (NFLD) and Plug In ICA (MB).

Thea Jones
September 28, 2020 - October 31, 2020

I am an interdisciplinary artist. My practice fluctuates between where I am and the trajectory from where I have come, continually hauling and sorting through the baggage as I go. Video, mending, installation and small iterations of performance have been used to observe the folly or fallacy of everyday living. I attempt to make work in a place that either exacerbates a task, proclaims to solve problems with miniature sized solutions or stimulates the obvious with volume.

– Thea Jones